Beak Up Crafts

I'll craft anything once


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How to… Crochet an iPad Mini Cover

This is a really nice and simple crochet project and something I made a few months after first picking up a hook and some yarn for the first time.

I thought it would be a nice project for the sunny spring days as you can use pretty bright colours.

I was struggling to find an iPad Mini case that I loved so I decided to make one for myself! My first effort was a bit wonky but for my second try I made a pocket-like pouch which worked perfectly, so I made another one for Wayne too!

IPad Mini covers

You can either choose to make the case in the same colour or mix it up with stripes. The pattern I’ve written below is for both, but if you want to make one in a block colour simply ignore the bits where it says to change yarn and keep on going!

What you will need:

Aran wool/yarn in one or two colours
A crochet hook – 4.5mm
Two buttons
A darning needle

Stitch description:

Ch – chain
Hdc – Half double crochet
St – stitch

Pattern:

Ch 27 (This should be long enough for the width of an iPad Mini, but if your tension is a bit tighter you may want to add extra stitches and adjust the numbers for the rest of the pattern accordingly).

R1: Using yarn A, Hdc in the 2nd ch from the hook. Hdc across in the outside loops only.
When you get to the end of the row instead of turning, continue around, working into the other loop of the starting chain. This is where you are creating the bottom of the pocket. This will bring you all the way round to the first Hdc (54).
At the end of the first round, crochet your next stitch in the first Hdc you made to join and finish the row, then mark this with a stitch marker. Move the stitch marker up with each completed round.

For the plain case:
R2-30: Hdc in each st around (54). Go to R31.

For the stripey case:
R2-3: Hdc in each st around (54). At the end of the third round change to yarn B in the final stitch.

R4-6: Hdc in each st around (54). At the end of the third round change to yarn A in the final stitch.

R7-9: Hdc in each st around (54). At the end of the third round change to yarn B in the final stitch.

R10-12: Hdc in each st around (54). At the end of the third round change to yarn A in the final stitch.

Repeat alternating the colours until you have completed round 30.

R31: At this stage, your iPad Mini should fit the in cosy (check!) but if not, you may wish to add extra rows to ensure a snug fit. This all depends on the tension you are crocheting with. Now you will make the flap for the case on one side only. Hdc in each st (27) then turn.

R32-33: Hdc in each st (27)  then turn.

Fasten off.

Fold the flap over and position the buttons in the right place before sewing them to the cosy.

Ch 8. Make a loop and stitch this to one side of the flap so it loops over the button to close the cosy. Ch 8 and repeat on the other side.

And that’s it! You have made a cute, bright and cheap iPad Mini cover!

I hope you enjoy using this pattern and I would love to see any iPad Mini crochet covers you make! If the pattern doesn’t make sense or if you have any questions please ask and I will be happy to help!

Kate x

 


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How to Make: A Rainbow Granny Square Blanket

Hello everyone,

I recently finished my first ever granny square blanket and thought it would be nice to pass on how to make one to anyone who is looking for help.

As a beginner in crochet, a granny square was the first thing I ever learned how to make. Practice makes perfect and I used it to help me get used to keeping the right tension while making something small that I could finish pretty quickly. However, making granny squares turned out to be quite addictive, so I carried on and soon had enough for a baby blanket!

This post will show you how to make a granny square, how to put granny squares together and how to make a rainbow border for your blanket.

You will need:

  • Different colours of wool/yarn. I used Aran yarn and had eight different colours, but the number is up to you depending on how you want the squares to look.  I had white, yellow, purple, fuschia pink, turquoise, charcoal grey, dark blue and mid blue.
  • 1 x crochet hook (I used a 4.5 (7) hook, but this depends on the type of yarn you use)
  • Time and patience!
Granny squares

My first granny squares!

  1. Make your first granny square. I looked around for the best videos on YouTube showing how to make these small woolly squares, and the best I found were by Bethintx1. They are really easy to follow and take you through every step and I would really recommend them to anyone here.
  2. Once you have made one granny square, if you would like to make a blanket the same size as the one I did you will need to make 29 more! That will make a blanket of 5 squares x 6 squares, although of course you can go bigger or smaller if you wish! Have fun with the colour combinations and maybe try to make 30 different colourways if you have enough different shades of yarn.

    Granny Squares

    Lots and lots of granny squares

  3. Fasten your squares together. After asking for some help on this blog, I was recommended Attic24‘s method of crocheting the squares together using a simple slip stitch method. I can confirm that this was a really easy way to put them all together.
    Border and no border

    Border and no border

    As my squares were in a variety of colours, I decided to single crochet a white border around each one before putting them together using white yarn to make sure the stitch colour was neat and uniform. If you don’t know how to do a single crochet you can find out how here, while Attic24’s granny square method is here.

  4. Finally, make the rainbow border! I picked out colours from my blanket for the border but you can choose any colours you like. I did mine in rainbow colours, starting at the bottom of the rainbow with white, then blue, working through turquoise, yellow, purple and finishing off with hot pink. To do this, I did rounds of half double crochet – one round in each colour – fastened off and crocheted over the fastened end with the next row. For the final row, I weaved the tail in using my hook. I chose to do half double crochet stitches for a bit of height so you could see each one of the colours while keeping the rows solid. If you don’t know how to do a half double crochet stitch you can find out how here.

    Blanket corner

    Blanket corner

And that’s how to make a granny square blanket with a rainbow border!

I hope you find this tutorial useful, but if not please let me know and I will try to help/change the instructions to make it clearer.

I would love to see any blankets you make so if you do make one please leave a link to some pictures in the comments section!

Kate x


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Inspired by the past – A trip to Temple Newsam

Hello everyone, I hope you’re all well today. Spring seems to be very much on its way now – dare I say it but there are blue skies above our home in east Yorkshire today… Probably cursed it now, though!

Yesterday Wayne and I had the day off work and so did our friend Aimee so we decided to head out and go and have a bit of culture. We met in Leeds and as the weather was a bit naff (think fog, depressing grey clouds and omnipresent drizzle) we knew we needed a mostly indoor activity. After giving it a bit of thought, we decided on a visit to Temple Newsam  –  a Tudor-Jacobean house with grounds landscaped by Capability Brown which was mentioned in the Domesday Book as “Neuhusum” in 1086.

Temple Newsam HouseI’ll skip the history lesson, but let’s just say through the Knights Templar (which gives the house and estate its name), to Elizabeth I seizing the property after the owner’s son Lord Henry Darnley married Mary Queen of Scots, the house has a colourful past. It is now owned by Leeds City Council and it was one of the places Wayne and I looked at as a possible wedding venue, before we fell in love with Rudding Park in Harrogate.

We started off with a walk around the house, which was grand but had surprisingly small rooms, apart from the picture gallery which was huge.

The thing that struck me the most was the soft furnishings. Although the four poster beds were more often than not draped in hundreds of metres of crimson red damask, the wallpaper (most of which was from the 18th century) looked really modern and fresh. I have to say I found the patterns and colours really inspiring. I love the soft muted colours and patterns, although maybe not the carpet – I’m guessing this might be a more recent addition!

Here are a few examples – I included the dark red one as it was furry to the touch!

I’m now trying to work out how I can incorporate this in some kind of craft…

Jazzy carpet

After the house we had a wander round the farm next to the property. This was really good fun and would be especially good for children. Here’s a few pictures of what we saw!

Have you ever visited anywhere and been inspired by the past? I would love to hear about it, especially if it’s close enough for a day trip!

Kate x